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Moon Knight Finally Confirms The Identity Of His Biggest Villain

With a number of deadly villains in the rogues gallery, many different enemies fight for the place of Moon Knight’s greatest foes. In fact, Moon Knight’s worst enemy might not be an external enemy at all.

This idea is in Moon Knight Center #14. In this issue, Mark Spector advises Stephen Grant and Jake Lockley, and all three alternate personas reside within the same body. Throughout this Moon Knight run, Mark Spector has held the reins as he runs the Midnight Mission, a last remnant of rest for night travelers who may need the protection Mr. Knight can provide. After Moon Knight’s confrontation with the Avengers during the Khuncho era, Spector convinces Grant and Lockley to let him be in charge of his own body alone, hoping that a united front will prevent the other heroes from considering the issue. dissociative identity disorder that makes you a liability in your domain. However, when Moon Knight nearly kills the evil Zodiac in front of his friend Reese, Steven Grant shows up to stop him from committing murder. This leads Mark to meet with his other identities and decide on the best path forward for the trio.

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Moon Knight #14 by Jed Mackay and Alessandro Cappuccio deals with this meeting of minds, deriving its title, “Soldier, Rich Man, Bastard”, from Mark’s identities and changes. Throughout the adventure, the three people explore his plight, furthering his reputation as one of the most dangerous heroes in the Marvel universe. In the end, they decide that the real cause of Mark Spector’s problems is largely Mark Spector himself, not his alternate characters or some outside villain.

Moon Knight vs. Stephen Gran
Moon Knight #14 takes a closer look at Moon Knight’s history in the Marvel universe and proves how Marc can be blamed more than any of the villains for him. Although Mark and other characters often dismiss his excessive violence as a result of DID, Stephen and Jake note that his influence was rarely, if ever, a real liability for Mark, and most of his problems stem from his tendencies. violent. . In fact, Mark’s adaptations claim that his influence often helped Mark, balancing his violent and reclusive tendencies with theirs.

As Stephen points out, Mark’s actions have earned him the reputation he has, despite the villains and evidence he encountered along the way. It’s a wonderful context for one of Marvel’s most self-destructive characters, who frames his violence and isolation primarily as an outlet for depression and self-loathing. This isn’t the first time Mark’s self-loathing and depression has been addressed on this tour, but it’s certainly the most direct. In the end, Moon Knight’s biggest problems stem from Mark’s tragic actions, suppressing his changes in an attempt to feel “normal” and pushing others away (including Jake and Stephen) to ease his pain.

Moon Knight admits he’s the problem
This issue represents a huge and exciting change for Moon Knight’s future, as Mark finally accepts that his flaws are fixable and takes steps to end the spiral of depression. He is determined to tackle the issues head-on with Jake and Stephen, working together instead of trying to forge a new life on his own to escape his past and his pain. Mark Spector is usually the villain who has done the most damage to Moon Knight’s life and reputation, but now he knows that he doesn’t have to be like this forever.

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